A Quick Look At The Volkswagen Golf

Volkswagen Golf

The Volkswagen Golf is a compact family car that was introduced for the 1974 model year and has been in constant production since. The Golf has also been known as the Volkswagen Rabbit, the Volkswagen MK1 and MK5, Volkswagen Jetta, Volkswagen Vento, Volkswagen Bora, and Volkswagen Caribe in various markets around the globe.

The Golf has won numerous awards during its production run. Some of the highlights include being named the 2009 World Car of the Year and being just one of three cars to be named the European Car of the Year twice (1992 and 2013). Over in America, it has been named to Car and Driver magazine’s ”10 Best” list multiple times and was Motor Trend magazine’s Car of the Year for 2015. Sales of the Volkswagen Golf have exceeded 30 million since inception and it is known as a reliable used car option. Let’s have a quick look at the history of the Golf and a few of the variants that may interest our readers who are looking to buy a dependable used car.

History of the Volkswagen Golf

The first generation of the Volkswagen Golf, also known as the MK1, was introduced for the 1974 model year to replace the iconic Volkswagen Beetle. It was powered by a 1,093 cc inline four-cylinder SOHC engine that offered a mere 49 bhp at 6000 rpm and 79 N·m of torque at 3000 rpm. The small engine offered great fuel economy for the time. It was available as a three-door hatch or a five-door hatch from the beginning. The first Golf GTI was introduced in 1976, offering a larger engine and better performance. 1976 also marked the introduction of a diesel engine. In 1979, the Jetta saloon variant was introduced. A cabrio and truck versions (Volkswagen Caddy) followed in 1980.

The first generation of the Volkswagen Golf, also known as the MK1, was introduced for the 1974 model year to replace the iconic Volkswagen Beetle. It was powered by a 1,093 cc inline four-cylinder SOHC engine that offered a mere 49 bhp at 6000 rpm and 79 N·m of torque at 3000 rpm. The small engine offered great fuel economy for the time. It was available as a three-door hatch or a five-door hatch from the beginning. The first Golf GTI was introduced in 1976, offering a larger engine and better performance. 1976 also marked the introduction of a diesel engine. In 1979, the Jetta saloon variant was introduced. A cabrio and truck versions (Volkswagen Caddy) followed in 1980.

1983 saw the introduction of the second generation of the Volkswagen Golf. Now powered by a larger 1,796 cc engine, the Golf grew in every dimension, but remained classified as a compact family car. Starting in 1985, the Golf could be bought with the Syncro all-wheel drive system. The second generation offered the same body variants as the first with the exception of the cabrio. Volkswagen opted to carry the first generation chassis and body style over for the cabrio through 1992.

The third generation debuted for the 1991 model year. The Golf’s dimensions grew once again and it struggled to retain its compact status in some markets. Volkswagen introduced a slew of new engines that featured the first turbocharged Indirect Direct Injection (TDI) diesel engine in a Golf and a narrow-angle VR6 engine. VW also offered the first Golf estate, the Golf Variant, and a new cabrio version.

The fourth MK4 fourth generation of the Golf was introduced in late 1997. It was marketed as the VW Bora and VW Jetta in some markets. The Variant was updated, but the cabrio was still based on the third generation body style. VW offered the high performance Golf R32 and brought its 1.8T turbocharged four-cylinder engine into the Golf lineup as an option.

The fifth and sixth generations of the Golf were largely mild refreshes. The Golf Plus was introduced during the fifth generation, adding a taller roofline. The biggest change made during the sixth generation was the switch from PD injector units in diesel engines to a common rail turbo system.

The seventh, and current, generation of the Volkswagen Golf debuted in 2012. It is built upon the same MQB platform as the Audi A3 and Skoda Octavia. It is larger than the sixth generation, but VW managed to shed 100 kg from its curb weight. VW also upgraded the interior quality of the Golf, while reducing interior noise.

Granted that is a very abbreviated history of the VW Golf, but it gives you a bit of an insight into the car. Now, let’s have a look at a few of the Golf variants that might interest you.

Volkswagen Golf (base)

Volkswagen Golf (base)

The first is the base Volkswagen Golf. These are small family cars that offer class-leading fuel economy, durability, and comfort for your growing family. They can be powered by several engines, ranging from 1,380 cc petrol engines to 1,980 cc turbocharged petrol engines, as well as numerous diesel options. The engines can be paired to a manual or automatic gearbox, depending on the trim level selected. One of the more fun to drive versions of the base Golf is the GTI, offering upgraded engine performance and improved handling.

Volkswagen Golf Variant

Volkswagen Golf Variant

As your family grows, your daily driver needs to keep pace. That is why the VW Golf Variant is such a great option for many families. It offers the rugged reliability of the Golf with the seating capacity and cargo space of an estate. The Variant offers great styling and superior fuel economy for the family that is constantly on the move.

Volkswagen Golf Touran

Volkswagen Golf Touran

Estate wagons are not the right fit for everyone. Some families prefer the look and feel of a multi-passenger vehicle. That is where the Golf Touran comes into play. Frequently powered by a more than capable 1,980 cc petrol engine, the Touran offers enough seating and cargo capacity to satisfy the busiest of families.

Volkswagen Golf Plus

Volkswagen Golf Plus

 

As we mentioned earlier, the VW Golf Plus offers more headroom due to its slightly taller interior stance. While slightly taller, the Golf Plus still handles well, not succumbing to the added body roll you may expect from a taller vehicle. It can be powered by any of the engine options found across the Golf line-up and it has the same trim options. The Golf Plus is a great family option!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Comment

Name

Website